Guide to the Notorious Bars of Alaska, by Doug Vandegraft

New, revised second edition! Since A Guide to the Notorious Bars of Alaska (250 pages) was first published in 2014, eight of the bars that were described in the first edition have since closed their doors forever. The revised second edition includes five additional bars that meet the criteria. Also added to the second edition are regional…

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What Happened in Craig, by Leland E. Hale

On a foggy afternoon in September of 1982 the Investor, a salmon fishing vessel, was engulfed in flames near the tiny village of Craig, Alaska. All efforts to stop the blaze were repulsed by the heat and fury of fire–until the blaze had run its course. Eight people, including a pregnant woman and two small…

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Little Annie Oakley and Other Rugged People, by Stewart Holbrook

From the brick-paved streets of Boston and New England, to the deserts of Arizona, to the lush forests of the Pacific Northwest, beloved author and columnist Stewart Holbrook takes his readers down uncharted paths in a series of delightful pieces. Little Annie Oakley and Other Rugged People (210 pages) is pure Americana that delves into…

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Alaska-Yukon Place Names, by James Phillips

Romantic history-filled names have long fired the imagination of every reader and visitor to the Northland. In Alaska-Yukon Place Names, author James W. Phillips takes the vacationing tourist, historian, and armchair traveler through the most memorable places in the Alaska-Yukon region. Since the most popular routes north to Alaska and the Yukon are the Marine Highway…

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Bad Friday, by Lew Freedman

On March 27, 1964, a magnitude 9.2 earthquake lasting more than five minutes rocked south central Alaska, leveling waterfronts, collapsing bridges, and crumbling landscapes. Bad Friday (265 pages) relives the most powerful quake in North American history, and the ensuing tidal waves that left homes broken, children orphaned, and infrastructure decimated. Yet, from within the…

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Eskimo Star, by Lael Morgan

The blazing marquee of the plush Astor Theater in New York City billed the 1933 premier of “Eskimo” as “THE BIGGEST PICTURE EVER MADE,” propelling an 27-year-old Inupiat Eskimo from Candle, Alaska, to overnight stardom. The handsome actor was not only the first Alaskan to become a Hollywood movie star but also the first non-white…

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Red Thunder, by David Matheson

Red Thunder (280 pages) is a memoir of a People. The story draws from the oral history of the Schi-tsu-umsh Indians, now called the Coeur d’Alene Tribe in Northern Idaho. This unique portrayal of pre-European Native Americans is an authentic work displaying the rich cultural teachings behind Native American life. Red Thunder is not only about courage, love…

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Reaching for a Star, by Gerald Bowkett

In 1955, with the drive for statehood stalled, a group of men and women from all over Alaska, delegates with strong convictions, given to strong, often colorful expression, created a state constitution that is now considered a model. Reaching for a Star (176 pages) follows the long road of proving that Alaska was politically mature,…

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49 at Last! by Claus-M Naske

49 at Last! (350 pages) reads like a plot-line for a political thriller; author Dr. Claus-M. Naske reveals how the Alaska statehood movement struggled through most of the 20th Century, decade after decade, always blocked by powerful special interests. Finally, the unrelenting pro-statehood forces won support from President Dwight D. Eisenhower–a breakthrough for their cause–and…

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North to the Future, by Dermot Cole

Alaska became a state in 1959 after nearly a century of federal rule and domination by powerful mining, timber, and canned-salmon interests. At last the people of Alaska would direct their own destiny. But would they? North to the Future (224 pages) documents the first fifty years, as Alaska’s fate continued to be influenced by…

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