Our Summer with the Eskimos, by Constance Helmericks

Our Summer with the Eskimos, by Constance Helmericks In the fall of 1944, Constance and Harmon “Bud” Helmericks built a cabin and overwintered in Alaska’s remote Brooks Range. With spring melt, they resumed their odyssey north, intent on crossing the Continental Divide to explore the arctic barrens beyond. Our Summer with the Eskimos, Connie’s third…

Read More

Our Alaskan Winter, by Constance Helmericks

Our Alaskan Winter, by Constance Helmericks Our Alaskan Winter completes Constance Helmericks’s bestselling trilogy about the 26-month trek she and her husband, Bud Helmericks, made across the top of northern Alaska.  In 1945 the poorly-clad couple are afoot on the Arctic coast as winter descends. They have survived a year on foot alone in the…

Read More

Surviving the Island of Grace, by Leslie Leyland Fields

Surviving the Island of Grace, by Leslie Leyland Fields Surviving the Island of Grace is a beautiful and haunting memoir of a woman who left the East Coast and moved to Alaska looking for a new life. In brilliant prose, Leslie Leyland Fields tells her story of adapting to life on a wilderness island without…

Read More

We Live in Alaska, by Constance Helmericks

We Live in Alaska, by Constance Helmericks Originally published in 1944, We Live in Alaska is the first book by acclaimed author, Constance Helmericks. At twenty-four, Connie and her young husband, Harmon “Bud” Helmericks, set off from Fairbanks, Alaska in a homemade canoe. Paddling down the Tanana and into the great Yukon River, they leave…

Read More

Fireweed, by Nellie Buxton Picken

Ed McLauren has fought his whole life: to build the Lazy Ear ranch, to pass responsible range management legislation, and to expose the unscrupulous and greedy developers who seek to rob the N’Chi-lix-czin of their birthright. In Fireweed (286 pages), Ed perseveres to speaks out in favor of controlled brush-burning to unwilling ears, while discomfited…

Read More

James J. Hill: A Great Life in Brief, by Stewart Holbrook

James J. Hill (158 pages), the “Empire Builder,” (1838-1916) was a Canadian-American railroad executive with the Great Northern Railway, responsible for building railways across the northern US. Part visionary, part robber baron, part buccaneer, Stewart Holbrook brings his story to life, in brief, as well as the lives of the other movers and shakers in…

Read More

People of the Noatak, by Claire Fejes

In 1946, Clair Fejes moved from New York City, where she had been exhibiting in the A.C.A. Gallery, to Fairbanks, Alaska. She ultimately became an artist in a pioneering community, and traveled to a Noatak hunting camp on the edge of the Kotzebue Sound, where she was irrevocably inspired by the people and landscape of…

Read More

Cold Starry Night, by Claire Fejes

Young Claire Fejes was a promising sculptor and painter in New York City in 1946, when her husband gave in to “gold fever”. She held the unconventional view that her career was as important as his. But in those days, a woman followed her husband, so Claire did – to Fairbanks, last stop on the…

Read More

Dreaming Bears, by J. Michael Holloway

Dreaming Bears (208 pages) is the true story of the rare friendship that develops between a young medical student with deep roots in the South and an elderly Indian couple in the wilds of northeast Alaska. In 1961, Mike Holloway, his brother Ted, and a college friend set out from South Carolina to spend the…

Read More

Write Hard, Die Free, by Howard Weaver

Howard Weaver advanced from foot soldier to field marshal in the Alaska Newspaper War, but he never left the fight. He spent time with small-town hoodlums and big-time politicians, crossed swords with Big Oil and Big Labor, and edited the Anchorage Daily News to the most unlikely David and Goliath upset in American journalism history and helped…

Read More