The enchanting story of how a mouse came to live in a Tlingit (Indian) clan house in Haines, Alaska, and became part of the culture. When the mouse finds the Tlingit clan house, he thinks he’s sneaky enough to avoid being caught, but what he doesn’t know is that the tribe leader is watching his…

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For half a century forester, biologist, teacher, Floyd Schmoe, has explored with huge enjoyment the widely varied points of interest of the Pacific Northwest. In For Love of Some Islands (236 pages), he writes about the islands and waters of Puget Sound, with particular attention to a recent summer spent there on a houseboat, observing,…

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Of Men and Mountains (360 pages) is a book of personal adventure and discovery of William O. Douglas. It is an account of the way Douglas and other men found a richer life in the mountains and how they found something else besides. In such country Douglas has noted, “Men can find deep solitude and under…

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Midnight Sun, Arctic Moon (216 pages) follows a young upstate New York woman who begins the adventure of a life-time as she moves away from her safe and conventional path.  She is unable to resist the excitement and challenge of a chance to become a geological explorer in Alaska, where she maps remote wilderness areas…

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This a gripping memoir of a winter season of crab-fishing in the Bering Sea, filled with scary moments, killer ice, dangerous work, and-for the lucky ones-financial rewards. For others, survival was their reward. Just 25, Joe Upton was the youngest guy aboard when the 104-foot Flood Tide pulled out of Seattle in March 1971 headed…

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The United States knew relatively little about Alaska prior to the turn of the century when the Klondike Gold Rush was about to attract thousands of stampeders north, many of them spilling over into Alaska as more gold was discovered on the Yukon River and her tributaries. The government had few reliable maps of the…

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Barbara Washburn never set out to become a mountaineering pioneer, but she wasn’t content to be a stay-at-home wife, either. In 1947, defying social convention, Washburn became the first woman to climb Alaska’s Mt. McKinley. Accidental Adventures (192 pages) chronicles her journeys with her husband, Bradford Washburn, on other expeditions to Alaska, the Grand Canyon,…

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