Surviving the Island of Grace, by Leslie Leyland Fields

Surviving the Island of Grace, by Leslie Leyland Fields Surviving the Island of Grace is a beautiful and haunting memoir of a woman who left the East Coast and moved to Alaska looking for a new life. In brilliant prose, Leslie Leyland Fields tells her story of adapting to life on a wilderness island without…

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We Live in Alaska, by Constance Helmericks

We Live in Alaska, by Constance Helmericks Originally published in 1944, We Live in Alaska is the first book by acclaimed author, Constance Helmericks. At twenty-four, Connie and her young husband, Harmon “Bud” Helmericks, set off from Fairbanks, Alaska in a homemade canoe. Paddling down the Tanana and into the great Yukon River, they leave…

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Guide to the Notorious Bars of Alaska, by Doug Vandegraft

New, revised second edition! Since A Guide to the Notorious Bars of Alaska (250 pages) was first published in 2014, eight of the bars that were described in the first edition have since closed their doors forever. The revised second edition includes five additional bars that meet the criteria. Also added to the second edition are regional…

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Fireweed, by Nellie Buxton Picken

Ed McLauren has fought his whole life: to build the Lazy Ear ranch, to pass responsible range management legislation, and to expose the unscrupulous and greedy developers who seek to rob the N’Chi-lix-czin of their birthright. In Fireweed (286 pages), Ed perseveres to speaks out in favor of controlled brush-burning to unwilling ears, while discomfited…

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What Happened in Craig, by Leland E. Hale

On a foggy afternoon in September of 1982 the Investor, a salmon fishing vessel, was engulfed in flames near the tiny village of Craig, Alaska. All efforts to stop the blaze were repulsed by the heat and fury of fire–until the blaze had run its course. Eight people, including a pregnant woman and two small…

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The Flight of the Arctic Tern, by Constance Helmericks

In June of 1947, Alaskan adventurers, Constance and Bud Helmericks, returned to the arctic wilderness in their first airplane. Originally published in 1952, Connie’s fifth book, The Flight of the Arctic Tern (342 pages), chronicles their lives from constructing a log cabin in the Brooks Range to flying the Arctic coast in search of their Inuit…

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Down the Wild River North, by Constance Helmericks

In suburban Arizona, 1964, Connie Helmericks announced to her two daughters, 12-year-old Ann and 14-year-old Jean, “We’re going to make a canoe expedition to the Arctic Ocean.” And for two successive summers, that’s exactly what they did. Down the Wild River North (328 pages) is the vividly told story of their adventures in the remote northern reaches…

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Riding the Wild Side of Denali, by Miki and Julie Collins

Identical twins Miki and Julie Collins trap, hunt, fish, and garden in Alaska’s wilderness just north of Denali National Park in Alaska’s vast interior. Their closest companions are loyal sled dogs and Icelandic horses, which eat fish and can withstand northern extremes. Whether taking a 1,900-mile excursion around Alaska by dog sled, defending their huskies…

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Raven House Mouse, by Jan Steinbright

The enchanting story of how a mouse came to live in a Tlingit (Indian) clan house in Haines, Alaska, and became part of the culture. When the mouse finds the Tlingit clan house, he thinks he’s sneaky enough to avoid being caught, but what he doesn’t know is that the tribe leader is watching his…

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James J. Hill: A Great Life in Brief, by Stewart Holbrook

James J. Hill (158 pages), the “Empire Builder,” (1838-1916) was a Canadian-American railroad executive with the Great Northern Railway, responsible for building railways across the northern US. Part visionary, part robber baron, part buccaneer, Stewart Holbrook brings his story to life, in brief, as well as the lives of the other movers and shakers in…

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