The Bentwood Box, by Nan McNutt

The Bentwood Box, by Nan McNutt Chris, a contemporary 14 yr. old Native American Tlingit boy, apprentices with his uncle who is designing and making a traditional northern Northwest Coast bentwood box. In the process of helping with the box, Chris has an adventure, which changes the course of his life. Nan’s McNutt’s introduction to…

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The Button Blanket, by Nan McNutt

The Button Blanket, by Nan McNutt Anne, a young contemporary Kwakwaka’wakw (Kwakiutl) girl, is going to dance in the ceremonial house for the first time. But who will help make her button blanket robe to dance in? Who will design the special family crest for her robe? As she asks each member of her family,…

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The Cedar Plank Mask, by Nan McNutt

The Cedar Plank Mask, by Nan McNutt Michael, a contemporary Makah boy from the west coast of Washington State, takes a museum fieldtrip with his classmates to learn about Northwest Coast Native American masks and, especially, the West coast style of the Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth peoples. Little does he know that Grandpa has a surprise…

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Villagers, by Claire Fejes

The Natives of Alaska, the Athabaskan Indians, are facing a momentous crisis. Their traditional way of life is being threatened with extinction by the culture of the white man. What changes have been wrought in the lifestyle of the Indians? How are they meeting the challenge to their heritage? In Villagers (224 pages), Claire Fejes–a resident…

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The Tlingit Indians, by Aurel Krause

In 1881, two German geographers were on their way to the continental United States from the Bering Sea Coast when they came upon a Native population in southeast Alaska that had formed a society far more complex than those of most other North American tribes. Upon return to Germany, Aurel Krause published “The Tlingit Indians.”…

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Cold River Spirits, by Jan Harper-Haines

Cold River Spirits (192 pages) is a wryly humorous and inspirational story about a proud Alaska Native family struggling to survive in two worlds. Sam and Louise Harper and their ten children make a soul-grinding transition into a modern white-dominated society where they face bigotry, poverty, and illness. Yet, Louise, the Athabascan matriarch, remains in…

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Red Thunder, by David Matheson

Red Thunder (280 pages) is a memoir of a People. The story draws from the oral history of the Schi-tsu-umsh Indians, now called the Coeur d’Alene Tribe in Northern Idaho. This unique portrayal of pre-European Native Americans is an authentic work displaying the rich cultural teachings behind Native American life. Red Thunder is not only about courage, love…

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Two Old Women, by Velma Wallis

Based on an Athabascan legend passed along from mother to daughter for many generations on the upper Yukon River in Alaska, this is the tragic and shocking story–with a surprise ending–of two elderly women abandoned by a migrating tribe that faces starvation brought on by unusually harsh Arctic weather and a shortage of fish and…

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A Cheechako Goes to the Klondike, by C.W. Adams

The Klondike Stampede caused a transportation boom in the north, where in its thrilling heyday about 250 wooden steamboats operated in the Yukon River drainage of Alaska and the Yukon. The sternwheelers became gold rush icons. But the hardy, pragmatic entrepreneurs who ran the boats were lured by profits, not romance. In 1901, a passenger’s…

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On the Edge of Nowhere, by James Huntington and Lawrence Elliott

For sheer excitement and adventure, few novels match the true-life story of James Huntington. The son of a white trapper and Indian mother, Huntington learned early to fight for survival in Alaska’s remote Kuskokwim region, where life was hard. Huntington’s mother once walked 1,000 miles in the dead of winter to return to her family.…

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